ARSRPE Conference Paper Database

The state of road safety for Aboriginal Australians - interventions and post-crash needs

Ferguson, Catherine, Segre, A (Peer reviewed)

Aboriginal / Community

2012

Aboriginal car occupants are 2.9 times more likely to die than other Australians if involved in a car crash, and Aboriginal pedestrians are 5.5 more times at risk. These figures are most likely understated as Indigenous status is not always recorded at the time of an incident. The extended nature of Aboriginal families means that a large number of people are affected by the injury /fatal injury of an Aboriginal individual. A range of methods have been used to develop this research. A literature review on what has been achieved in Aboriginal Road Safety and the issues that have been identified is presented. In a second part of the research, interviews with five Aboriginal men were conducted to investigate the needs of Aboriginal people for post-crash interventions. Participants were recruited using a snowballing technique and all worked in health or health related positions in Western Australia. Interviews were conducted using a semi structured process that allowed the respondents to provide their own views and experiences of road trauma. : A range of initiatives in relation to road safety were identified across Australia and in particular in Western Australia where approximately 70% of Aboriginal residents live in remote communities. In response to the information provided by Aboriginal respondents a series of vignettes were developed to present the issues that can affect Aboriginal people as a result of road trauma. More collaborative work needs to be undertaken within Aboriginal communities to develop an understanding of road trauma and to develop culturally appropriate interventions that reduce the effects of crashes on Aboriginal people. Aboriginal people also require culturally appropriate post-crash support.