ARSRPE Conference Paper Database

SELF EFFICACY, PERCEIVED CRASH RISK AND NORMS ABOUT SPEEDING: DIFFERENTIATING BETWEEN MOST DRIVERS AND HABITUAL SPEEDERS

Read, Shari, Kirby, Gary, Batini, Chris

Speeding

2002

This research was conducted to inform the development of a community education campaign targeting drivers who regularly drive more than 10km/h over the posted speed limit. The study examined the attitudes, beliefs and perceptions of the ?well over? driver in comparison to the ?at or about? driver. The research was designed to identify the motivations underlying the behaviour of the ?well over? driver and to provide a strategy for the development of a media campaign to target this group. It was found that drivers in the ?well over? group were quite defensive in justifying their speeding behaviour and very assertive in judging their own driving skills in relation to others. These drivers were also more likely to view the law as existing for other people rather than themselves.

In comparison to those in the ?at or about? group, the ?well over? drivers had a preference for visual, demonstrative advertising. However, scenarios and ad executions must be credible and leave no room for misinterpretation or incorrect allocation of blame. There was also evidence to suggest that the ?well over? drivers would be responsive to increased penalties for speeding and a more visual police presence.